12-18 February 1735

  • Thur 17 Feb:  The infamously brutal Essex gang was broken up.  The gang specialized in deer poaching and violent robberies and assault.  Members included: “Samuel Gregory, his brothers Jeremiah and Jasper, Joseph Rose, Mary Brazier, John Jones, Thomas Rowden, and a young John Wheeler” (x), and was for a period connected to Dick Turpin, the notorious English highwayman.  The caught members (not including Turpin) were hanged, except Brazier, who was exiled to the colonies, and Wheeler, whose confession made the  gang’s defeat possible and who was freed and died of presumably natural causes.
  • Fri 18 Feb:  Benjamin Franklin publishes another article in The Pennsylvania Gazette, this one entitled “Self-Denial Not the Essence of Virtue.”  Benjamin, that was already evident from your prior behavior.  Not strictly necessary.

5-11 February 1935

  • Tues 8 Feb:  The first opera in the United States, “Flora,” opens in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • Fri 11 Feb:  Benjamin Franklin publishes “A Man of Sense,” an account of a conversation he supposedly heard in the street, in his Pennsylvania Gazette.  It comes to the conclusion that a man, no matter how many sciences he has mastered, is not a man of sense until he has learned the Science of Virtue, he is just “a Fool, a Dunce, and a Blockhead.”  It’s pretty great.

22-28 January 1735

  • Sun 23 January: Richard Benyon takes office as the President of Fort St. George/Madras, an administrative subdivision of British India and what is now modern-day Chennai, the capital of Tamil Nadu, India.  Regarded as one of the best early presidents of Madras.

15-21 January 1735

  • Wed 19 January:  The first woman to be hanged in Georgia (USA).  She was the indentured servant of the Savannah cow-keeper, William Wise, and was convicted of murdering him with the assistance of her husband Richard White by holding his head under a bucket of water when he commanded her to bathe him.  Her ghost is said to haunt Wright Square, the location of her hanging.